Volunteers help turn the tide on litter at Browns Bay

Over 40 local volunteers took part in the annual beach clean-up and survey of Browns Bay, Islandmagee.  The data gathered will help the Marine Conservation Society identify the main sources of litter. The event was organised by Elena Aceves-Cully from Ballystrudder, with the assistance of Mullaghdough Primary School, Nicola Murray from Keep Northern Ireland Beautiful and Mid and East Antrim Council.  INLT 39-650-CON
Over 40 local volunteers took part in the annual beach clean-up and survey of Browns Bay, Islandmagee. The data gathered will help the Marine Conservation Society identify the main sources of litter. The event was organised by Elena Aceves-Cully from Ballystrudder, with the assistance of Mullaghdough Primary School, Nicola Murray from Keep Northern Ireland Beautiful and Mid and East Antrim Council. INLT 39-650-CON

Over 40 local volunteers participated in the annual beach clean-up and survey of Browns Bay, Islandmagee.

The event was organised by Elena Aceves-Cully from Ballystrudder, with help from Mullaghdubh PS, Nicola Murray from Keep Northern Ireland Beautiful and Mid and East Antrim BoroughCouncil.

The data gathered will help the Marine Conservation Soci ety identify the main sources of litter.

The survey recorded a record total of 781 items, with the top six items being plastic pieces (209), wood pieces (41), plastic bottles and lids (51), cigarette stubs (29), glass pieces (46) and ceramic pieces (30).

Elena said: “Often people who visit the beach do not use bins provided, spoiling the beach for other visitors. Individuals must take responsibility for their own actions.”

“All participants expressed an interest in doing this clean-up again in the future. I think it is a great way to make children in particular more aware of litter and of the need to keep our beaches clean.”

Elena also expressed concerns about the level of erosion at the site in recnt years.

“Most of the rocks which once protected the beach on both sides have been washed away since I started surveying this beach 10 years ago,” she added.

“If we don’t protect the sand on this beach, in another 10 years or so there will be little left of it.”