DCSIMG

Local road 'very dangerous'

A MAGHERAMORNE man this week claimed that a busy back road to Ballycarry is "an accident waiting to happen."

Craig Revill, a landscape gardener, told the Times people in the area cannot understand why a section of the main rural route to Ballycarry is untreated in icy weather.

From Magheramorne the Ballylig Road runs from the main coastal route to the Ballypollard Road. The Ballypollard turns into the Hillhead Road, which runs into Ballycarry village.

Craig says Magheramorne residents can’t understand why the middle section of the route - from the Ballylig/Ballypollard junction to Ballycarry is not treated in icy weather. Craig told the Times the road is “like a sheet of ice” and an “accident waiting to happen.”

Of the Ballypollard Road, he said: “It’s gritted up to the Ballylig then in between the Ballypollard and the 30mph sign into Ballycarry it’s never touched.

“If there’s ever any ice it’s just a solid sheet. There are families who have to take that route and it’s very dangerous. The roads are treacherous. Even if there’s a slight bit of damp the road freezes.”

Gritting boxes are available along the Ballylig Road, he said, but there do not appear to be any along the Ballypollard Road.

The Times contacted DRD Roads Service but no-one was available at the time of going to press.

The DRD’s website states almost 4,300 miles of road are gritted when necessary - around 28 percent of Northern Ireland’s network. To qualify for gritting a main road needs to be used by more than 1,500 vehicles per day. Other busy routes with ‘special difficulties’, such as hilly areas, carrying between 1,000 and 1,500 vehicles per day also qualify. Buses, including school buses, receive ‘special consideration,’ the DRD say. This means that , for example, a 40-seater bus counts as 40 vehicles. Other areas that are treated include the shortest route from any settlement with 100 or more dwellings to the salted network. It costs nearly 80,000 every time DRD salt the road network.

 
 
 

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