Head start for Larne tot Wyatt, thanks to fundraisers

Wyatt Magee. INLT 27-208-AM
Wyatt Magee. INLT 27-208-AM
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A Larne toddler suffering from flat head syndrome is thriving after receiving a £2000 corrective helmet paid for by local fundraisers.

One-year-old Wyatt Magee was born with plagiocephaly, which causes a baby’s head to be flattened on one side, making it look asymmetrical.

Five weeks ago, the toddler and his family travelled to Manchester’s Technology in Motion Centre, where the local boy was fitted out with a custom-made specialist helmet to correct the condition.

Since then, his mother Kerry says she has seen a dramatic improvement in her son’s condition.

“Wyatt is getting on brilliantly,” she revealed.

“When we went over for our initial consultation he got a scan to take the measurements of his head and the consultant said it was the most severe case he had seen in a long time.

“At that stage, they couldn’t say how much the helmet would help, but it has already had a fantastic effect.

“We have already noticed a difference of seven inches in his head in this short space of time.”

Kerry says that Wyatt has quickly adjusted to his new headgear.

“He was a bit tearful for the first day or two,” she recalled.

“He has to wear the helmet for 23 hours a day but he loves it now, it has become his thing and it is comfortable for him.”

The state-of-the art helmets are not available on the NHS, and Wyatt’s was funded by donations to the “Wyatt’s Head Start” initiative set up by Kerry.

Wyatt will have to return to Manchester every six weeks for adjustments to his helmet as his head shape changes.

Meanwhile, after celebrating Wyatt’s first birthday on Tuesday (July 7), Kerry says her family is looking forward to the future.

“Wyatt’s balance has improved a lot, there is a big difference and he is not falling to one side so much,” she said.

“His balance and coordination have improved so he has more confidence and he has started walking.

“The past year has been a hard time with constant tests and scans, but now we can move forward as a family.

“It will make a big difference to Wyatt as he grows up.””

Kerry is also planning to set up a charity to fund helmets for other children suffering from flat head syndrome.